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The solid form of mixed uranium oxide, which is produced from uranium ore in the uranium recovery (milling) process.

The material is a mixture of uranium oxides, which can vary in proportion and color from yellow to orange to dark green (blackish) depending on the temperature at which the material is dried (which affects the level of hydration and impurities), with higher drying temperatures producing a darker and less soluble material.

Yellowcake was commonly referred to as U3O8, because that chemical compound historically comprised the majority of the yellowcake produced by uranium recovery facilities utilizing conventional milling methods.

Most modern uranium recovery facilities utilize in situ recovery methods and produce a yellowish compound comprised mostly of uranyl peroxide dihydrate. This material is then transported to a uranium conversion facility, where it is transformed into uranium hexafluoride (UF6), in preparation for fabricating fuel for nuclear reactors.

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Reaction in which two substances (elements or compounds) combine to form one compound.

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Critical Temperature

The temperature above which a gas cannot be liquefied, the temperature above which a substance cannot exhibit distinct gas and liquid phases.

Half-Reaction

Either the oxidation part or the reduction part of a redox reaction.

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Any species that can accept a share in an electron pair.

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Weak repulsion by a magnetic field.

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Consisting of only one element.

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A process pertaining to a change in structure of a protein form regular to irregular arrangement of the polypeptide chains.

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Reaction of a substance with water.

Sigma Bonds

Bonds resulting from the head-on overlap of atomic orbitals, in which the region of electron sharing is along and (cylindrically) symmetrical to the imaginary line connecting the bonded atoms.