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A fairly strong dipole-dipole interaction (but still considerably weaker than the covalent or ionic bonds) between molecules containing hydrogen directly bonded to a small, highly electronegative atom, such as N, O, or F.

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xenon trioxide

A colorless, nonvolatile solid, XeO3, explosive when dry: in solution it is called xenic acid.

Electrophoresis

A technique for separation of ions by rate and direction of migration in an electric field.

Ionization Isomers

Isomers that result from the interchange of ions inside and outside the coordination sphere.

Autoionization

An ionization reaction between identical molecules.

Atomic Number


Integral number of protons in the nucleus, defines the identity of element.
 

Specific Gravity

The ratio of the density of a substance to the density of water.

Mass

A measure of the amount of matter in an object. Mass is usually measured in grams or kilograms.

Continuous Spectrum

Spectrum that contains all wave-lengths in a specified region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

Fluids

Substances that flow freely, gases and liquids.

Electron Affinity

The amount of energy absorbed in the process in which an electron is added to a neutral isolated gaseous atom to form a gaseous ion with a 1- charge, has a negative value if energy is released.

Heat of Condensation

The amount of heat that must be removed from one gram of a vapor at it's condensation point to condense the vapour with no change in temperature.

Alpha (a) Particle

Helium ion with 2+ charge, an assembly of two protons and two neutrons.

Emulsion

Colloidal suspension of a liquid in a liquid.

Barometer

A device for measuring pressure.

Contact Process

Industrial process by which sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid are produced from sulfur dioxide.

Band Theory of Metals

Theory that accounts for the bonding and properties of metallic solids.

Electrolytic Cells

Electrochemical cells in which electrical energy causes nospontaneous redox reactions to occur. An electrochemical cell in which chemical reactions are forced to occur by the application of an outside source of electrical energy.

Periodicity

Regular periodic variations of properties of elements with atomic number (and position in the periodic table).

Ore

A natural deposit containing a mineral of an element to be extracted.

Gem-dimethyl group

Two methyl groups of the same carbon atom.