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A Compound of the general formula R-C-O-R1 where R and R1 may be the same or different, and may be either aliphatic or aromatic.

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Catenation

Bonding of atoms of the same element into chains or rings.
The bonding together of atoms of the same element to form chains.
The ability of an element to bond to itself.

Explosive

A chemical or compound that causes a sudden, almost instantaneous release or pressure, gas, heat and light when subjected to sudden shock, pressure, high temperature or applied potential.

Heat of Condensation

The amount of heat that must be removed from one gram of a vapor at it's condensation point to condense the vapour with no change in temperature.

Half-Cell

Compartment in which the oxidation or reduction half-reaction occurs in a voltaic cell.

Boiling Point Elevation

The increase in the boiling point of a solvent caused by the dissolution of a nonvolatile solute.

Barometer

A device for measuring pressure.

Supercritical Fluid

A substance at temperature above its critical temperature.

Associated Ions

Short-lived species formed by the collision of dissolved ions of opposite charges.

Photochemical Oxidants

Photochemically produced oxidizing agents capable of causing damage to plants and animals.

Saccharic acid

A white, needlelike, crystalline, water-soluble solid or syrup, C6H10O8, usually made by the oxidation of cane sugar, glucose, or starch by nitric acid. Also called "Glucaric acid."