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A binary compound of oxygen.

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Molecular Geometry

The arrangement of atoms (not lone pairs of electrons) around a central atom of a molecule or polyatomic ion.

Suspension

A heterogeneous mixture in which solute-like particles settle out of solvent-like phase some time after their introduction.

Extensive Property

A property that depends upon the amount of material in a sample.

Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP)

A written program developed and implemented by an employer designating proceedures, equipment, personal protective equipment, and work practices that are capable of protecting employees from the health hazards presented by hazardous chemicals usid in that particular workplace.

Melting Point

The temperature at which liquid and solid coexist in equilibrium, also the freezing point.

Miscibility

The ability of one liquid to mix with (dissolve in) another liquid.

Dimer

Molecule formed by combination of two smaller (identical) molecules.

Reverse Osmosis

Forcing solvent molecules to flow through a semipermable membrane from a concentated solution into a dilute solution by the application of greater hydrostatic pressure on concentrated side than the osmotic pressure opposing it.

Solvation

The process by which solvent molecules surround and interact with solute ions or molecules.

Saponification

Hydrolysis of esters in the presence of strong soluable bases.

Iron

Discovered : known to ancient civilisations.

Origin : The name comes from the Anglo-Saxon ‘iren’, and the symbol from the Latin ‘ferrum’, meaning iron.
Description :Iron is an enigma - it rusts easily and yet is the most important of all metals, world production exceeds 700 million tons a year. Small amounts of carbon are added to iron to produce steel and when chromium.
is added to this, the result is non-corroding stainless steel (small amounts of nickel may also be added). Iron is also an essential element for all forms of life. The average human contains about 4 grams, much of which circulates as haemoglobin in the blood, the job of which is to carry oxygen from our lungs to where it is needed. If the diet does not contain 10 milligrams a day, anaemia will eventually develop. Foods such as liver, kidney, molasses, brewer’s yeast, cocoa and liquorice contain a lot of iron.
Atomic No:26 Mass No:56

Conjugate Acid-base Pair

In Bronsted-Lowry terminology, a reactant and product that differ by a proton, H+.

DP number

The degree of polymerization, the average number of monomer units per polymer unit.

Allotropic Modifications (Allotropes)

Different forms of the same element in the same physical state.

Intermolecular Forces

Forces between individual particles (atoms, molecules, ions) of a substance.

Ketone

Compound in which a carbonyl group is bound to two alkyl or two aryl groups, or to one alkyl and one aryl group.

Weak Electrolyte

A substance that conducts electricity poorly in a dilute aqueous solution.

Active Metal

Metal with low ionization energy that loses electrons readily to form cations.

Half-Cell

Compartment in which the oxidation or reduction half-reaction occurs in a voltaic cell.

Ionization

In aqueous solution, the process in which a molecular compound reacts with water and forms ions.