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The rotation of plane polarized light by one of a pair of optical isomers.

 

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Debye

The unit used to express dipole moments.

Mole Fraction

The number of moles of a component of a mixture divided by the total number of moles in the mixture.

 

Octahedral

A term used to describe molecules and polyatomic ions that have one atom in the center and six atoms at the corners of a octahedron.

Mass

A measure of the amount of matter in an object. Mass is usually measured in grams or kilograms.

Graham's Law

The rates of effusion of gases are inversely proportional to the square roots of their molecular weights or densities.

Free Radical

A highly reactive chemical species carrying no charge and having a single unpaired electron in an orbital.

Hydration

Reaction of a substance with water.

Zinc

Discovered: known in India and China before 1500 and to the Greeks and Romans before 20 BC as the copper-zinc alloy brass
Origin: The name is derived from the German ‘Zink’.
Atomic no: 30
Mass No: 65
Description: A grey metal with a blue tinge. World production exceeds 7 million tons a year, and it is used to galvanise iron to prevent it rusting. It is also employed in alloys and batteries, and as zinc oxide to stabilise rubber and plastics. Zinc is essential for all living things, and is important for growth and development. The average human body contains about 2.5 grams and takes in about 15 milligrams per day. Some foods have above average levels of zinc, including herring, beef, lamb, sunflower seeds and cheese.

Melting Point

The temperature at which liquid and solid coexist in equilibrium, also the freezing point.

Transition State Theory

Theory of reaction rates that states that reactants pass through high-energy transition states before forming products.