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Describes processes that absorb heat energy.

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Manometer

A two-armed barometer.

Weak Field Ligand

A Ligand that exerts a weak crystal or ligand field and ge- nerally forms high spin complexes with metals.

Mass Deficiency

The amount of matter that would be converted into energy if an atom were formed from constituent particles.

London Forces

Very weak and very short-range attractive forces between short-lived temporary (induced) dipoles, also called dispersion Forces.

Reducing Agent

The substance that reduces another substance and is oxidized.

Dextrorotatory

Refers to an optically active substance that rotates the plane of plane polarized light clockwise, also called dextro.

Neutron

A neutral subatomic particle having a mass of 1.0087 amu.

Conjugated Double Bonds

Double bonds that are separated from each other by one single bond -C=C-C=C-.

Background Radiation

Ratiation extraneous to an experiment. Usually the low-level natural radiation form cosmic rays and trace radioactive substances present in our environment.

Double Bond

Covalent bond resulting from the sharing of four electrons (two pairs) between two atoms.

Emission Spectrum

Spectrum associated with emission of electromagnetic radiation by atoms (or other species) resulting from electronic transitions from higher to lower energy states.

 

Physical Change

A change in which a substance changes from one physical state to another but no substances with different composition are formed. Example Gas to Liquid - Solid.

 

Doublet

Two peaks or bands of about equal intensity appearing close together on a spectrogram.

Paramagnetism

Attraction toward a magnetic field, stronger than diamagnetism, but still weak compared to ferromagnetism.

Anode

In a cathode ray tube, the positive electrode. Electrode at which oxidation occurs.

Functional Group

A group of atoms that represents a potential reaction site in an organic compound.

Lewis Acid

Any species that can accept a share in an electron pair.

Linkage Isomers

Isomers in which a particular ligand bonds to a metal ion through different donor atoms.

 

Alums

Hydrated sulfates of the general formula M+M3+(SO4)2.12H2).

Alkylbenzene

A compound containing an alkyl group bonded to a benzene ring.