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Solid triester of glycerol and (mostly) saturated fatty acids.

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Thermal Cracking

Decomposition by heating a substance in the presence of a catalyst and in the absence of air.

 

Linkage Isomers

Isomers in which a particular ligand bonds to a metal ion through different donor atoms.

 

Bond Energy

The amount of energy necessary to break one mole of bonds of a given kind (in gas phase).The amount of energy necessary to break one mole of bonds in a substance, dissociating the sustance in the gaseous state into atoms of its elements in the gaseous state.

Halogens

Group VIIA elements: F, Cl, Br, I

Active Metal

Metal with low ionization energy that loses electrons readily to form cations.

Associated Ions

Short-lived species formed by the collision of dissolved ions of opposite charges.

Biodegradability

The ability of a substance to be broken down into simpler substances by bacteria.

 

Equivalence Point

The point at which chemically equivalent amounts of reactants have reacted.

Nonbonding Orbital

A molecular orbital derived only from an atomic orbital of one atom, lends neither stability nor instability to a molecule or ion when populated with electrons.

Effective Collisons

Collision between molecules resulting in a reaction, one in which the molecules collide with proper relative orientations and sufficient energy to react.