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Discovered : at both Berkeley, California, USA, and Dubna, near Moscow, Russia in 1970. Description:A highly radioactive metal which does not occur naturally, and of which only a few atoms have ever been made. It is of research interest only. Origin:The element is named after the Russian town of Dubna.

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Formula Unit

The smallest repeating unit of a substance. The molecule for nonionic substances

Atomic Radius

Radius of an atom.

Nonpolar Bond

Covalent bond in which electron density is symmetrically distributed.

Titration

A Procedure in which one solution is added to another solution until the chemical reaction between the two solutes is complete, the concentration of one solution is known and that of the other is unknown.

 

Polyene

A compound that contains more than one double bond per molecule.

Semiconductor

A substance that does not conduct electricity at low temperatures but does so at higher temperatures.

Electrolytic Conduction

Conduction of electrical current by ions through a solution or pure liquid.

Osmotic Pressure

The hydrostatic pressure produced on the surface of a semipermable membrane by osmosis.

Amide

Compound containing the O-C-N group.Compound that can be considered a derivative of ammonia in which one or more hydrogens are replaced by a alkyl or aryl groups.

 

Calorie

The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one gram of water from 14.5°C to 15.5°C. 1 calorie = 4.184 joules.

Coefficient of expansion

The ratio of the change in length or volumen of a body to the original lengthor volume for a unit change in temperature.

Diamagnetism

Weak repulsion by a magnetic field.

Chain Reaction

A reaction that, once initiated, sustains itself and expands. This is a reaction in which reactive species, such as radicals, are produced in more than one step. These reactive species, radicals, propagate the chain reaction.

 

Valence Electrons

Outermost electrons of atoms, usually those involved in bonding.

Radioactivity

The spontaneous disintegration of atomic nuclei.

Molar Solubility

Number of moles of a solute that dissolve to produce a litre of saturated solution.

Dosimeter

A small, calibrated electroscope worn by laboratory personnel and designated to detect and measure incident ionizing radiation or chemical exposure.

Heat of Fusion

The amount of heat required to melt one gram of solid at its melting point with no change in temperature. Usually expressed in J/g. The molar heat of fusion is the amount of heat required to melt one mole of a solid at its melting point with no change in temperature and is usually expressed in kJ/mol.

Intermolecular Forces

Forces between individual particles (atoms, molecules, ions) of a substance.

Percent by Mass

100% times the actual yield divided by theoretical yield.