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A proton acceptor

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Endothermic

Describes processes that absorb heat energy.

Can water burn?

It’s known that water consists of atoms of molecules of oxygen and hydrogen. Since any compound with oxygen indicates the ability of the substance to burn, water is no exception. Thus, water has a surprising property of already "burnt out" compound.

Colloid

A heterogeneous mixture in which solute-like particles do not settle out.

Theoretical Yield

Maximum amount of a specified product that could be obtained from specified amounts of reactants, assuming complete consumption of limiting reactant according to only one reaction and complete recovery of product.

Hydrogen

Discovered : by Henry Cavendish in 1766.
Isolated in London, UK.
Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘hydro genes’, meaning water forming.
Description :A colourless, odourless gas that burns and can form an explosive mixture with air. It is currently manufactured from methane gas, but is also produced by the electrolysis of water and aqueous salts. The gas is used to make such key materials as ammonia, cyclohexane and methanol, which are intermediates in the production of fertilisers, plastics and pharmaceuticals. Some see hydrogen gas as the clean fuel of the future - generated from water and returning to water when it is oxidised. Hydrogen-powered fuel cells are increasingly being seen as pollution-free sources of energy.

Chemical Change

A change in which one or more new substances are formed.

Polarimeter

A device used to measure optical activity.

Hess' Law of Heat Summation

The enthalpy change for a reaction is the same whether it occurs in one step or a series of steps.

Electrolytic Cells

Electrochemical cells in which electrical energy causes nospontaneous redox reactions to occur. An electrochemical cell in which chemical reactions are forced to occur by the application of an outside source of electrical energy.

Sublimation

The direct vaporization of a sold by heating without passing through the liquid state.