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Integral number of protons in the nucleus, defines the identity of element.
 

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Buret

A piece of volumetric glassware, usually graduated in 0.1-mL intervals, that is used to deliver solutions to be used in titrations in a quantitative (dropwise) manner.

Autoionization

An ionization reaction between identical molecules.

Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle

It is impossible to determine accurately both the momentum and position of an electron simultaneously.

Heterogeneous Mixture

A mixture that does not have uniform composition and properties throughout.

Bronsted-Lowry Base

A proton acceptor

Linear Accelerator

A device used for accelerating charged particles along a straight line path.

Nonelectrolyte

A substance whose aqueous solutions do not conduct electricity.

Coke

An impure form of carbon obtained by destructive distillation of coal or petroleum.

Heat of Fusion

The amount of heat required to melt one gram of solid at its melting point with no change in temperature. Usually expressed in J/g. The molar heat of fusion is the amount of heat required to melt one mole of a solid at its melting point with no change in temperature and is usually expressed in kJ/mol.

Calorimeter

A device used to measure the heat transfer between system and surroundings.

Explosive

A chemical or compound that causes a sudden, almost instantaneous release or pressure, gas, heat and light when subjected to sudden shock, pressure, high temperature or applied potential.

Coordination Sphere

The metal ion and its coordinating ligands but not any uncoordinated counter-ions.

Suspension

A heterogeneous mixture in which solute-like particles settle out of solvent-like phase some time after their introduction.

Fluids

Substances that flow freely, gases and liquids.

Voltage

Potential difference between two electrodes, a measure of the chemical potential for a redox reaction to occur.

Eutrophication

The undesirable overgrowth of vegetation caused by high concentrates of plant nutrients in bodies of water.

Supercooled Liquids

Liquids that, when cooled, apparently solidify but actually continue to flow very slowly under the influence of gravity e.g glass.

Boyle's Law

At constant temperature the volume occupied by a definite mass of a gas is inversely proportional to the applied pressure.

Geometrical Isomers

Compounds with different arrangements of groups on either side of a bond with restricted rotation, such as a double bond or a single bond in a ring, for example cis-trans isomers of certain alkenes. Stereoisomers that are not mirror images of each other, also known as position isomers.

Combustible

Classification of liquid substances that will burn on the basis of flash points. A combustible liquid means any liquid having a flash point at or above 37.8°C (100°F) but below 93.3°C (200°F), except any mixture having components with flash points of 93.3°C (200°F) or higher, the total of which makes up 99 percent or more of the total volume of the mixture.