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A ligand atom whose electrons are shared with a Lewis acid.

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Helium

Discovered : by Sir William Ramsay in London, and independently by P.T. Cleve and N.A. Langlet in Uppsala, Sweden in 1895.
Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘helios’,sun.
Description :A colourless, odourless gas that is totally unreactive. It is extracted from natural gas wells, some of which contain gas that is 7% helium. It is used in deep sea diving for balloons and, as liquid helium, for low temperature research. The Earth’s atmosphere contains 5 parts per million by volume, totalling 400 million tons, but it is not worth extracting it from this source at present.
Atomic No:2 MAss No:4

Endothermicity

The absorption of heat by a system as the process occurs.

Corrosion

Oxidation of metals in the presence of air and moisture.

Composition Stoichiometry

Descibes the quantitative (mass) relationships among elements in compounds.

Strong Electrolyte

A substance that conducts electricity well in a dilute aqueous solution.

 

Formula Weight

The mass of one formula unit of a substance in atomic mass units.

 

yttrium

A rare trivalent metallic element, found in gadolinite and other minerals. Symbol: Y, at. wt.: 88.905, at. no.: 39, sp. gr.: 4.47. Cf."rare-earth element."

Yttrium has a silver-metallic luster and is relatively stable in air unless finely divided. Turnings of the metal, however, ignite in air if their temperature exceeds 400oC. Yttrium oxide is one of the most important compounds of yttrium and accounts for the largest use. It is widely used in making YVO4 europium, and Y2O3 europium phosphors to give the red color in color television tubes.

Free Energy, Gibbs Free Energy

The thermodynamic state function of a system that indicates the amount of energy available for the system to do useful work at constant T and P.

Rate-determining Step

The slowest step in a mechanism, the step that determines the overall rate of reaction.

Pineapple literally "erodes" the tongue

Everyone who has ever tried fresh pineapple knows that if you eat too much, your lips and tongue hurt for a while. This is because the pineapple contains an enzyme called bromelain. This enzyme literally "erodes" the tongue.