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Photochemically produced oxidizing agents capable of causing damage to plants and animals.

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Homogeneous Catalyst

A catalyst that exists in the same phase (solid, liquid or gas) as the reactants. The process is called Homogeneous Catalysis.

Osmotic Pressure

The hydrostatic pressure produced on the surface of a semipermable membrane by osmosis.

History of fireworks

There is an assumption that the history of fireworks started in China, about 2000 years ago. It is possible that the Chinese accidentally discovered explosions by burning bamboo canes.

Ternary Acid

A ternary compound containing H, O, and another element, often a nonmetal.

Control Rods

Rods of materials such as cadmium or boron steel that act as neutron obsorbers (not merely moderaters) used in nuclear reactors to control neutron fluxes and therfore rates of fission.

Natural Radioactivity

Spontaneous decomposition of an atom.

Metal

An element below and to the left of the stepwise division (metalloids) in the upper right corner of the periodic table, about 80% of the known elements are metals.

Magnetic Quantum Number (mc)

Quantum mechanical solution to a wave equation that designates the particular orbital within a given set (s, p, d, f ) in which a electron resides.

Band Theory of Metals

Theory that accounts for the bonding and properties of metallic solids.

Heat Capacity

The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a body (of any mass) one degree Celsius.