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The breaking up of a compound into separate ions.

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Active Metal

Metal with low ionization energy that loses electrons readily to form cations.

DP number

The degree of polymerization, the average number of monomer units per polymer unit.

Contact Process

Industrial process by which sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid are produced from sulfur dioxide.

Miscibility

The ability of one liquid to mix with (dissolve in) another liquid.

Equivalence Point

The point at which chemically equivalent amounts of reactants have reacted.

Cathodic Protection

Protection of a metal (making ir a cathode) against corrosion by attaching it to a sacrifical anode of a more easily oxidized metal.

Total Ionic Equation

Equation for a chemical reaction written to show the predominant form of all species in aqueous solution or in contact with water.

Molecular Equation

Equation for a chemical reaction in which all formulas are written as if all substances existed as molecules, only complete formulas are used.

Surface Tension

It is the force in dynes acting along the surface of the liquid 1cm in length and perpendicular to it.

Hydrocarbons

Compounds that contain only carbon and hydrogen.