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Discovered : known to ancient civilisations.

Origin : The name comes from the Anglo-Saxon ‘iren’, and the symbol from the Latin ‘ferrum’, meaning iron.
Description :Iron is an enigma - it rusts easily and yet is the most important of all metals, world production exceeds 700 million tons a year. Small amounts of carbon are added to iron to produce steel and when chromium.
is added to this, the result is non-corroding stainless steel (small amounts of nickel may also be added). Iron is also an essential element for all forms of life. The average human contains about 4 grams, much of which circulates as haemoglobin in the blood, the job of which is to carry oxygen from our lungs to where it is needed. If the diet does not contain 10 milligrams a day, anaemia will eventually develop. Foods such as liver, kidney, molasses, brewer’s yeast, cocoa and liquorice contain a lot of iron.
Atomic No:26 Mass No:56

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Energy that matter processes by virtue of its motion.

Period

The elements in a horizontal row of the periodic table.

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At constant temperature the volume occupied by a definite mass of a gas is inversely proportional to the applied pressure.

Ternary Acid

A ternary compound containing H, O, and another element, often a nonmetal.

Continuous Spectrum

Spectrum that contains all wave-lengths in a specified region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

Flux

A substance added to react with the charge, or a product of its reduction, in metallurgy, usually added to lower a melting point.

Electrochemistry

Study of chemical changes produced by electrical current and the production of electricity by chemical reactions.

Greenhouse Effect

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Downs Cell

Electrolytic cell for the commercial electrolysis of molten sodium chloride. For further information see Electrochemistry or Fuel Cells.

Faraday

One faraday of electricity corresponds to the charge on 6.022 x 1023 electrons, or 96,487.301 coulombs.

Group

A vertical column in the periodic table, also called a family.

Mass Deficiency

The amount of matter that would be converted into energy if an atom were formed from constituent particles.

Cohesive Forces

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DP number

The degree of polymerization, the average number of monomer units per polymer unit.

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The buildup of a product of oxidation or a reduction of an electrode, preventing further reaction.

Conjugated Double Bonds

Double bonds that are separated from each other by one single bond -C=C-C=C-.

Spectral Line

Any of a number of lines corresponding to definite wavelengths of an atomic emission or absorption spectrum, represents the energy difference between two energy levels.

 

Alpha (a) Particle

Helium ion with 2+ charge, an assembly of two protons and two neutrons.

Levorotatory

Refers to an optically active substance that rotates the plane of plane polarized light counterclockwise, also called levo.

Voltage

Potential difference between two electrodes, a measure of the chemical potential for a redox reaction to occur.