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Energy required to pair two electrons in the same orbital.

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Substance

Any kind of matter all specimens of which have the same chemical composition and physical properties.

 

Homogeneous Catalyst

A catalyst that exists in the same phase (solid, liquid or gas) as the reactants. The process is called Homogeneous Catalysis.

Heat of Vaporization

The amount of heat required to vaporize one gram of a liquid at its boiling point with no change in temperature. Usually expressed in J/g. The molar heat of vaporization is the amount of heat required to vaporize one mole of liquid at its boiling point with no change in temperature and usually expressed ion kJ/mol.

Law of Conservation of Matter

There is no detectable change in the quantity of matter during an ordinary chemical reaction.

Crystalline Solid

A solid characterized by a regular, ordered arrangement of particles.

Heterocyclic Amine

Amine in which the nitrogen is part of a ring.

Gel

Colloidal suspension of a solid dispersed in a liquid, a semirigid solid.

Dispersing Medium

The solvent-like phase in a colloid.

Equilibrium Constant

A quantity that characterizes the position of equilibrium for a reversible reaction, its magnitude is equal to the mass action expression at equilibrium. K varies with temperature.

Flux

A substance added to react with the charge, or a product of its reduction, in metallurgy, usually added to lower a melting point.