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The substance that oxidizes another substance and is reduced.

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Percent Composition

The mass percent of each element in a compound.

Reactants

Substances consumed in a chemical reaction.

Capillary

A tube having a very small inside diameter.

Dissociation Constant

Equilibrium constant that applies to the dissociation of a comples ion into a simple ion and coordinating species (ligands).

Cell Potential

Potential difference, Ecell, between oxidation and reduction half-cells under nonstandard conditions.

 

Conformations

Structures of a compound that differ by the extent of rotation about a single bond.

Molecular Orbital Theory

A theory of chemical bonding based upon the postulated existence of molecular orbitals.

Bubbles

Have you ever noticed that soap bubbles go up in winter and fall down in summer? The reason is that warm air is lighter than cold. And in winter the difference between the air temperature in the room (especially near the windows) and the one you exhale into the bubble is enough to overcome the heaviness of its shell.

Oil

Liquid triester of glycerol and unsaturated fatty acids.

Radioactive Dating

Method of dating ancient objects by determining the ratio of amounts of mother and daughter nuclides present in an object and relating the ratio to the object?s age via half-life calculations.