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The hydrostatic pressure produced on the surface of a semipermable membrane by osmosis.

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Most Popular

Solvation

The process by which solvent molecules surround and interact with solute ions or molecules.

Electrophoresis

A technique for separation of ions by rate and direction of migration in an electric field.

Natural Radioactivity

Spontaneous decomposition of an atom.

Proton

A subatomic particle having a mass of 1.0073 amu and a charge of +1, found in thew nuclei of atoms.

Unsaturated Hydrocarbons

Hydrocarbons that contain double or triple carbon-carbon bonds.

Law of Conservation of Matter

There is no detectable change in the quantity of matter during an ordinary chemical reaction.

Daughter Nuclide

Nuclide that is produced in a nuclear decay.

 

Critical Mass

The minimum mass of a particular fissionable nuclide in a given volume required to sustain a nuclear chain reaction.

Total Ionic Equation

Equation for a chemical reaction written to show the predominant form of all species in aqueous solution or in contact with water.

Electroplating

Plating a metal onto a (cathodic) surface by electrolysis.

Atomic Number


Integral number of protons in the nucleus, defines the identity of element.
 

Ionization Constant

Equilibrium constant for the ionization of a weak electrolyte.

Standard Electrode Potential

By convention, potential, Eo, of a half-reaction as a reduction relative to the standard hydrogen electrode when all species are present at unit activity.

 

Cathodic Protection

Protection of a metal (making ir a cathode) against corrosion by attaching it to a sacrifical anode of a more easily oxidized metal.

Nuclear Reaction

Involves a change in the composition of a nucleus and can evolve or absorb an extraordinarily large amount of energy.

Theoretical Yield

Maximum amount of a specified product that could be obtained from specified amounts of reactants, assuming complete consumption of limiting reactant according to only one reaction and complete recovery of product.

Polarimeter

A device used to measure optical activity.

Polar Bond

Covalent bond in which there is an unsymmetrical distribution of electron density.

Water Equivalent

The amount of water that would absorb the same amount of heat as the calorimeter per degree temperature increase.

Solvent

The dispersing medium of a solution.