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Corrects standard electrode potentials for nonstandard conditions.

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Isotopes

Two or more forms of atoms of the same element with different masses, atoms containing the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons.

Double Bond

Covalent bond resulting from the sharing of four electrons (two pairs) between two atoms.

Freezing Point Depression

The decrease in the freezing point of a solvent caused by the presence of a solute.ing Point

Nuclear Fission

The process in which a heavy nucleus splits into nuclei of intermediate masses and one or more protons are emitted.

Bond Energy

The amount of energy necessary to break one mole of bonds of a given kind (in gas phase).The amount of energy necessary to break one mole of bonds in a substance, dissociating the sustance in the gaseous state into atoms of its elements in the gaseous state.

Detergent

A soap-like emulsifer that contains a sulfate, SO3 or a phosphate group instead of a carboxylate group.

Metallic Conduction

Conduction of electrical current through a metal or along a metallic surface.

Law of Combining Volumes (Gay-Lussac's Law)

At constant temperature and pressure, the volumes of reacting gases (and any gaseous products) can be expressed as ratios of small whole numbers.

 

Exothermicity

The release of heat by a system as a process occurs.

Hydrocarbons

Compounds that contain only carbon and hydrogen.

Crystal Lattice

A pattern of arrangement of particles in a crystal.

Amine

Derivatives of ammonia in which one or more hydrogen atoms have been replaced by organic groups.

Compound

A substance of two or more elements in fixed proportions. Compounds can be decomposed into their constituent elements.

Heterocyclic Amine

Amine in which the nitrogen is part of a ring.

Crystal Field Stabilization Energy

A measure of the net energy of stabilization gained by a metal ion's nonbonding d electrons as a result of complex formation.

Critical Point

The combination of critical temperature and critical pressure of a substance.

Polydentate

Refers to ligands with more than one donor atom.

Denaturation

A process pertaining to a change in structure of a protein form regular to irregular arrangement of the polypeptide chains.

Bronsted-Lowry Acid

A proton donor.

Corrosion

Oxidation of metals in the presence of air and moisture.