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Spontaneous decomposition of an atom.

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Excited State

Any state other than the ground state of an atom or molecule.

Designated area

An area that may be used for work with carcinogens, reproductive toxins, or substances that have a high degree of acute toxicity. A designated area may be the entire laboratory, an area of a laboratory, or a device such as a laboratory hood.

Double Bond

Covalent bond resulting from the sharing of four electrons (two pairs) between two atoms.

Electrode Potentials

Potentials, E, of half-reactions as reductions versus the standard hydrogen electrode.

Solvent

The dispersing medium of a solution.

Proton

A subatomic particle having a mass of 1.0073 amu and a charge of +1, found in thew nuclei of atoms.

Ionization

In aqueous solution, the process in which a molecular compound reacts with water and forms ions.

Half-Reaction

Either the oxidation part or the reduction part of a redox reaction.

Weak Electrolyte

A substance that conducts electricity poorly in a dilute aqueous solution.

Linear Accelerator

A device used for accelerating charged particles along a straight line path.

Weak Field Ligand

A Ligand that exerts a weak crystal or ligand field and ge- nerally forms high spin complexes with metals.

Saponification

Hydrolysis of esters in the presence of strong soluable bases.

K Capture

Absorption of a K shell (n=1) electron by a proton as it is converted to a neutron.

Sigma Bonds

Bonds resulting from the head-on overlap of atomic orbitals, in which the region of electron sharing is along and (cylindrically) symmetrical to the imaginary line connecting the bonded atoms.

Binary Acid

A binary compound in which H is bonded to one or more of the more electronegative nonmetals.

Formula

Combination of symbols that indicates the chemical composition of a substance.

 

Octahedral

A term used to describe molecules and polyatomic ions that have one atom in the center and six atoms at the corners of a octahedron.

Delocalization

Of electrons, refers to bonding electrons that are distributed among more than two atoms that are bonded together, occurs in species that exhibit resonance.
The formation of a set of molecular orbitals that extend over more than two atoms, important in species that valence bond theory describes in terms of resonance.

Associated Ions

Short-lived species formed by the collision of dissolved ions of opposite charges.

Faraday's Law of Electrolysis

One equivalent weight of a substance is produced at each electrode during the passage of 96,487 coulombs of charge through an electrolytic cell.