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A technique for measuring the temperature, direction, and magnitude of thermal transitions in a sample material by heating/cooling and comparing the amount of energy required to maintain its rate of temperature increase or decrease with an inert reference material under similar conditions.

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Where is ozone used?

Ozone is widely used in various areas of our life. It is used in medicine, in industry, in everyday life.

Quantum Mechanics

Mathematical method of treating particles on the basis of quantum theory, which assumes that energy (of small particles) is not infinitely divisible.

Solute

The dispersed (dissolved) phase of a solution.

Melting Point

The temperature at which liquid and solid coexist in equilibrium, also the freezing point.

Heat of Vaporization

The amount of heat required to vaporize one gram of a liquid at its boiling point with no change in temperature. Usually expressed in J/g. The molar heat of vaporization is the amount of heat required to vaporize one mole of liquid at its boiling point with no change in temperature and usually expressed ion kJ/mol.

Chemical Hygiene Officer (CHO)

A person or employee who is qualified by training or experience to provide technical guidance in the development and implementations of the provisions of a Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP)

Differential Thermometer

A thermometer used for accurate measurement of very small changes in temperature.

Osmosis

The process by which solvent molecules pass through a semipermable membrane from a dilute solution into a more concentrated solution.

 

Ampere

Unit of electrical current, one ampere equals one coulomb per second.

 

Deposition

The direct solidification of a vapor by cooling, the reverse of sublimation.