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A technique for measuring the temperature, direction, and magnitude of thermal transitions in a sample material by heating/cooling and comparing the amount of energy required to maintain its rate of temperature increase or decrease with an inert reference material under similar conditions.

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Solubility Product Constant

Equilibrium constant that applies to the dissolution of a slightly soluble compound.

Saturated Hydrocarbons

Hydrocarbons that contain only single bonds. They are also called alkanes or paraffin hydrocarbons.

Optical Activity

The rotation of plane polarized light by one of a pair of optical isomers.

 

xenon hexafluoride

A colorless, crystalline compound, XeF6, that melts at 50°C to a yellow liquid, and boils at 75°C.

Polarimeter

A device used to measure optical activity.

Cohesive Forces

All the forces of attraction among particles of a liquid.

Ideal Gas Law

The product of pressure and the volume of an ideal gas is directly proportional to the number of moles of the gas and the absolute temperature.

Autoionization

An ionization reaction between identical molecules.

Hydrate

A solid compound that contains a definite percentage of bound water.

Graham's Law

The rates of effusion of gases are inversely proportional to the square roots of their molecular weights or densities.