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A technique for observing the temperature, direction, and magnitude of thermally induced transitions in a material by heating/cooling a sample and comparing its temperature with that of an inert reference material under similar conditions.

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Avogadro's Law

At the same temperature and pressure, equal volumes of all gases contain the same number of molecules.

Polyene

A compound that contains more than one double bond per molecule.

xylene

Any of three oily, colorless, water-insoluble, flammable, toxic, isomeric liquids, C8H10, of the benzene series, obtained mostly from coal tar: used chiefly in the manufacture of dyes.

Continuous Spectrum

Spectrum that contains all wave-lengths in a specified region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

Amphoterism

The ability to react with both acids and bases.Ability of substance to act as either an acid or a base.

Ampere

Unit of electrical current, one ampere equals one coulomb per second.

 

Effective Collisons

Collision between molecules resulting in a reaction, one in which the molecules collide with proper relative orientations and sufficient energy to react.

 

Heterogeneous Mixture

A mixture that does not have uniform composition and properties throughout.

Nernst Equation

Corrects standard electrode potentials for nonstandard conditions.

Dimer

Molecule formed by combination of two smaller (identical) molecules.