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A technique for observing the temperature, direction, and magnitude of thermally induced transitions in a material by heating/cooling a sample and comparing its temperature with that of an inert reference material under similar conditions.

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Aufbau ('building up') Principle

Describes the order in which electrons fill orbitals in atoms.

Derivative

A compound that can be imagined to arise from a partent compound by replacement of one atom with another atom or group of atoms. Used extensively in orgainic chemistry to assist in identifying compounds.

Enantiomer

One of the two mirror-image forms of an optically active molecule.

Molarity

Number of moles of solute per litre of solution.

Polar Bond

Covalent bond in which there is an unsymmetrical distribution of electron density.

Atomic Number


Integral number of protons in the nucleus, defines the identity of element.
 

Suspension

A heterogeneous mixture in which solute-like particles settle out of solvent-like phase some time after their introduction.

Ion

An atom or a group of atoms that carries an electric charge.

ytterbia

Ytterbia is a colorless compound, Yb2O3, used in certain alloys and ceramics. Also known as ytterbium oxide.

Specific Rate Constant

An experimentally determined (proportionality) constant, which is different for different reactions and which changes only with temperature, k in the rate-law expression: Rate = k [A] x [B]v.