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The properties of the elements are periodic functions of their atomic numbers.

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Molar Solubility

Number of moles of a solute that dissolve to produce a litre of saturated solution.

Isotopes

Two or more forms of atoms of the same element with different masses, atoms containing the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons.

Melting Point

The temperature at which liquid and solid coexist in equilibrium, also the freezing point.

Dynamic Equilibrium

An equilibrium in which processes occur continuously, with no net change. When two (or more) processes occur at the same rate so that no net change occurs.

Hydrogen Bond

A fairly strong dipole-dipole interaction (but still considerably weaker than the covalent or ionic bonds) between molecules containing hydrogen directly bonded to a small, highly electronegative atom, such as N, O, or F.

Saccharide

An organic compound containing a sugar or sugars.

Oil

Liquid triester of glycerol and unsaturated fatty acids.

Electron Deficient Compounds

Compounds that contain at least one atom (other than H) that shares fewer than eight electrons.

Isoelectric

Having the same electronic configurations.

Ether

Compound in which an oxygen atom is bonded to two alkyl or two aryl groups, or one alkyl and one aryl group.