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Isomers in which a particular ligand bonds to a metal ion through different donor atoms.

 

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Amorphous Solid

A noncrystalline solid with no well-defined ordered structure.

Solution

Homogeneous mixture of two or more substances.

Osmotic Pressure

The hydrostatic pressure produced on the surface of a semipermable membrane by osmosis.

Cis-

The prefix used to indicate that groups are located on the same side of a bon about which rotation is restricted.

Fluorescence

Absorption of high energy radiation by a substance and subsequent emission of visible light.

Polymer

A large molecule consisting of chains or rings of linked monomer units, usually characterized by high melting and boiling points.

Electromotive Series

The relative order of tendencies for elements and their simple ions to act as oxidizing or reducing agents, also called the activity series.

Salicylaldehyde

An oily, slightly water-soluble liquid, C7H6O2, having an almondlike odor: used chiefly in perfumery and in the synthesis of coumarin.

S Orbital

A spherically symmetrical atomic orbital, one per energy level.

ytterbia

Ytterbia is a colorless compound, Yb2O3, used in certain alloys and ceramics. Also known as ytterbium oxide.

Adsorption

Adhesion of a species onto the surfaces of particles.

London Forces

Very weak and very short-range attractive forces between short-lived temporary (induced) dipoles, also called dispersion Forces.

Enthalpy

The heat content of a specific amount of substance, defined as E= PV.

Viscosity

Resistance offered by the molecules of a liquid to flow is termed as viscosity.

Outer Orbital Complex

Valence bond designation for a complex in which the metal ion utilizes d orbitals in the outermost (occupied) shell in hybridization.

Polyene

A compound that contains more than one double bond per molecule.

Detergent

A soap-like emulsifer that contains a sulfate, SO3 or a phosphate group instead of a carboxylate group.

Periodicity

Regular periodic variations of properties of elements with atomic number (and position in the periodic table).

Law of Definite Proportions (Law of Constant Composition)

The law stating that a pure substance will always have the same percent by weight. Different samples of a pure compound always contain the same elements in the same proportions by mass.

DP number

The degree of polymerization, the average number of monomer units per polymer unit.