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Refers to crystals having the same atomic arrangement.

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Autoionization

An ionization reaction between identical molecules.

Raoult's Law

The vapor pressure of a solvent in an ideal solution decreases as its mole fraction decreases.

Bronsted-Lowry Base

A proton acceptor

Lewis Dot Formula (Electron Dot Formula)

Representation of the core of a molecule, ion or formula unit by showing atomic symbols and only outer shell electrons.

Solute

The dispersed (dissolved) phase of a solution.

Hard Water

Water containing Fe3+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ ions, which forms precipates with soap.

Open Sextet

Refers to species that have only six electrons in the highest energy level of the central element (many Lewis acids).

Freezing Point Depression

The decrease in the freezing point of a solvent caused by the presence of a solute.ing Point

Solubility Product Principle

The solubility product constant expression for a slightly soluble compound is the product of the concentrations of the constituent ions, each raised to the power that corresponds to the number of ions in one formula unit.

Condensation

Liquefaction of vapor.