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Hydrolysis of esters in the presence of strong soluable bases.

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Foam

Colloidal suspension of a gas in a liquid.

Osmotic Pressure

The hydrostatic pressure produced on the surface of a semipermable membrane by osmosis.

Standard Entropy

The absolute entropy of a substance in its standard state at 298 K.

Binding Energy (nuclear binding energy)

The energy equivalent (E = mc^2) of the mass deficiency of an atom.  where: E = is the energy in joules, m is the mass in kilograms, and c is the speed of light in m/s^2

Alkylbenzene

A compound containing an alkyl group bonded to a benzene ring.

Helium

Discovered : by Sir William Ramsay in London, and independently by P.T. Cleve and N.A. Langlet in Uppsala, Sweden in 1895.
Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘helios’,sun.
Description :A colourless, odourless gas that is totally unreactive. It is extracted from natural gas wells, some of which contain gas that is 7% helium. It is used in deep sea diving for balloons and, as liquid helium, for low temperature research. The Earth’s atmosphere contains 5 parts per million by volume, totalling 400 million tons, but it is not worth extracting it from this source at present.
Atomic No:2 MAss No:4

Crystal Lattice

A pattern of arrangement of particles in a crystal.

DP number

The degree of polymerization, the average number of monomer units per polymer unit.

Chemical Change

A change in which one or more new substances are formed.

Coordination Number

In describing crystals, the number of nearest neighbours of an atom or ion. The number of donor atoms coordinated to a metal.