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States that a system at equilibrium, or striving to attain equilibrium, responds in such a way as to counteract any stress placed upon it.
If a stress (change of conditions) is applied to a system at equilibrium, the system shifts in the direction that reduces stress.

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Amphiprotism

Ability of a substance to exhibit amphiprotism by accepting donated protons.

Colloid

A heterogeneous mixture in which solute-like particles do not settle out.

Electrolyte

A substance whose aqueous solutions conduct electricity.

 

Diamonds Are Forever

Diamonds are still a girl's best friend, right? We love the shiny gems. They are the most popular rocks sold today. But what exactly are they, anyway? Where do they come from? What else are they used for?

Effective Nuclear Charge

The nuclear charge experienced by the outermost electrons of an atom, the actual nuclear charge minus the effects of shielding due to inner-shell electrons.
Example: Set of dx2-y2 and dz2 orbitals, those d orbitals within a set with lobes directed along the x-, y-, and z-axes.

Photochemical Oxidants

Photochemically produced oxidizing agents capable of causing damage to plants and animals.

Weak Field Ligand

A Ligand that exerts a weak crystal or ligand field and ge- nerally forms high spin complexes with metals.

Anion

A negative ion, an atom or goup of atoms that has gained one or more electrons.

 

Electrode Potentials

Potentials, E, of half-reactions as reductions versus the standard hydrogen electrode.

xylic acid

Any of six colorless, crystalline, isomeric acids having the formula C9H10O2, derived from xylene.