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A solid compound that contains a definite percentage of bound water.

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Ideal Gas

A hypothetical gas that obeys exactly all postulates of the kinetic-molecular theory.

 

Metallic Bonding

Bonding within metals due to the electrical attraction of positively charges metal ions for mobile electrons that belong to the crystal as a whole.

First Law of Thermodynamics

The total amount of energy in the universe is constant (also known as the Law of Conservation of Energy) energy is neither created nor destroyed in ordinary chemical reactions and physical changes.

Reaction Quotient

The mass action expression under any set of conditions (not necessarily equlibrium), its magnitude relative to K determines the direction in which the reaction must occur to establish equilibrium.

Ampere

Unit of electrical current, one ampere equals one coulomb per second.

 

Photoelectric Effect

Emission of an electron from the surface of a metal caused by impinging electromagnetic radiation of certain minimum energy, current increases with increasing intensity of radiation.

 

Fatty Acids

An aliphatic acid, many can obtained from animal fats.

Breeder Reactor

A nuclear reactor that produces more fissionable nuclear fuel than it consumes.

Conformations

Structures of a compound that differ by the extent of rotation about a single bond.

S Orbital

A spherically symmetrical atomic orbital, one per energy level.