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A gas or mixture of gases having, in a container an absolute pressure exceeding 40 psi at 21.1°C (70°F)


A gass or mixture having in a container, an absolute pressure exceeding 104 psi at 54.4°C (130°F) regardless of the pressure at (21.1°C (70°F)
A liquid having a vapour pressure exceeding 40 psi at 37.8°C (70°F) as determined by ASTM D-323-72.

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Sigma Orbital

Molecular orbital resulting from head-on overlap of two atomic orbitals.

Effective Collisons

Collision between molecules resulting in a reaction, one in which the molecules collide with proper relative orientations and sufficient energy to react.

 

Substance

Any kind of matter all specimens of which have the same chemical composition and physical properties.

 

Yellowcake

The solid form of mixed uranium oxide, which is produced from uranium ore in the uranium recovery (milling) process.

Amphiprotism

Ability of a substance to exhibit amphiprotism by accepting donated protons.

Suspension

A heterogeneous mixture in which solute-like particles settle out of solvent-like phase some time after their introduction.

Disproportionation Reactions

Redox reactions in which the oxidizing agent and the reducing agent are the same species.

Bonding Pair

Pair of electrons involved in a covalent bond.

Hess' Law of Heat Summation

The enthalpy change for a reaction is the same whether it occurs in one step or a series of steps.

Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle

It is impossible to determine accurately both the momentum and position of an electron simultaneously.