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The ability of a substance to become permanently magnetized by exposure to an external magnetic field.

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Boiling Point Elevation

The increase in the boiling point of a solvent caused by the dissolution of a nonvolatile solute.

Boiling Point

The temperature at which the vapor pressure of a liquid is equal to the applied pressure, also the condensation point

Helium

Discovered : by Sir William Ramsay in London, and independently by P.T. Cleve and N.A. Langlet in Uppsala, Sweden in 1895.
Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘helios’,sun.
Description :A colourless, odourless gas that is totally unreactive. It is extracted from natural gas wells, some of which contain gas that is 7% helium. It is used in deep sea diving for balloons and, as liquid helium, for low temperature research. The Earth’s atmosphere contains 5 parts per million by volume, totalling 400 million tons, but it is not worth extracting it from this source at present.
Atomic No:2 MAss No:4

Osmotic Pressure

The hydrostatic pressure produced on the surface of a semipermable membrane by osmosis.

Alloying

Mixing of metal with other substances (usually other metals) to modify its properties.

Coordination Isomers

Isomers involving exchanges of ligands between complex cation and complex anion of the same compound.

Ternary Compound

A compound consisting of three elements, may be ionic or covalent.

Bomb Calorimeter

A device used to measure the heat transfer between system and surroundings at constant volume.

Sublimation

The direct vaporization of a sold by heating without passing through the liquid state.

Moderator

A substance such as hydrogen, deuterium, oxygen or paraffin capable of slowing fast nuetrons upon collision.

Hydrophilic Colloids

Colloidal particles that repel water molecules.

Absorption Spectrum

Spectrum associated with absorption of electromagnetic radiation by atoms (or other species) resulting from transitions from lower to higher energy states. An absorption spectrum is the inverse of an emission spectrum.

Ionization

In aqueous solution, the process in which a molecular compound reacts with water and forms ions.

Condensed Phases

The liquid and solid phases, phases in which particles interact strongly.

D-Orbitals

Beginning in the third energy level, aset of five degenerate orbitals per energy level, higher in energy than s and p orbitals of the same energy level.

 

Domain

A cluster of atoms in a ferromagnetic substance, all of which align in the same direction in the presence of an external magnetic field.

Substance

Any kind of matter all specimens of which have the same chemical composition and physical properties.

 

Acyl Group

Compound derived from a carbonic acid by replacing the --OH group with a halogen (X), usually --Cl, general formula is O R--C--X.

Bonding Orbital

A molecular orbit lower in energy than any of the atomic orbitals from which it is derived, lends stability to a molecule or ion when populated with electron.

Hydrate Isomers

Isomers of crystalline complexes that differ in whether water is present inside or outside the coordination sphere.