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Discovered : known to ancient civilisations
Origin : The name is derived from 'Cuprum', the Latin name for Cyprus.


Description :A reddish-gold metal that is easily worked and drawn into wire. It has great ability to conduct both heat and electricity. Traditionally it has been one of the coinage metals along with silver and gold, but it is the most common and therefore the least valued of this group. Historically, copper was the first metal to be worked by people, and the discovery that it could be hardened with a little tin to form the alloy bronze gave its name to the Bronze Age. The metal is an essential element for humans.
Atomic No:29 Mass No:63.5

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Le Chatelier's Principle

States that a system at equilibrium, or striving to attain equilibrium, responds in such a way as to counteract any stress placed upon it.
If a stress (change of conditions) is applied to a system at equilibrium, the system shifts in the direction that reduces stress.

Nickel-cadmium cell (Nicad battery)

A dry cell in which the anode is Cd, the cathode is NiO2, and the electrolyte is basic.

Law of Partial Pressures (Dalton's Law)

The total pressure exerted by a mixture of gases is the sum of the partial pressures of the individual gases.

Mother Nuclide

Nuclide that undergoes nuclear decay.

Low Spin Complex

Crystal field designation for an inner orbital complex, contains electrons paired t2g orbitals before eg orbitals are occupied in octahedral complexes.

Catalyst

A substance that speeds up a chemical reaction without being consumed itself in the reaction.
A substance that alters (usually increases) the rate at which a reaction occurs.

Safranine

Also called "phenosafranine". A purplish-red, water-soluble dye, C18H14N4, used for textiles and as a stain in microscopy.

Bronsted-Lowry Acid

A proton donor.

Amine Complexes

Complex species that contain ammonia molecules bonded to metal ions.

Natural Radioactivity

Spontaneous decomposition of an atom.