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A compound formed by interaction of sucrose with a metallic oxide, usually lime, and useful in the purification of sugar.

 

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Geiger counter

A gas filled tube which discharges electriaclly when ionizing radiation passes through it.

Electrical Conductivity

Ability to conduct electricity.

Saccharide

An organic compound containing a sugar or sugars.

Atomic Radius

Radius of an atom.

Alums

Hydrated sulfates of the general formula M+M3+(SO4)2.12H2).

Artificial Transmutation

An artificially induced nuclear reaction caused by the bombardment of a nucleus with subatomic particiles or small nucei.

Structural Isomers

Compounds that contain the same number of the same kinds of atoms in different geometric arrangements.

Amine Complexes

Complex species that contain ammonia molecules bonded to metal ions.

Resonance

The concept in which two or more equivalent dot formulas for the same arrangement of atoms (resonance structures) are necessary to describe the bonding in a molecule or ion.

Nitric Acid

HNO3: A strong acid, it is toxic and can cause severe burns. Transparent colorless or yellowish, fuming, suffocating, caustic and corrosive liquid. Nitric acid boiling point is 83C. A 70 percent solution is used in the S.S.E. laboratory for junction depth measurements. Nitric acid is also present in the metal etch solution used for the Aluminum etch procedure.

Cation

A positive ion, an atom or group of atoms that has lost one or more electrons.

Supercritical Fluid

A substance at temperature above its critical temperature.

Colloid

A heterogeneous mixture in which solute-like particles do not settle out.

Fuel Cells

Voltaic cells in which the reactants (usually gases) are supplied continuously.
A voltaic cell that converts the chemical energy of a fuel and an oxidizing agent directly into electriacl energy on a continuous basis.

Enantiomer

One of the two mirror-image forms of an optically active molecule.

Oxidation-reduction Reactions

Reactions in which oxidation and reduction occur, also called redox reactions.

Denatured

A commercial term used to describe ethanol that has been rendered unfit for human consumption because of the addition of harmful ingredients to make it sales tax-expempt.

 

Gel

Colloidal suspension of a solid dispersed in a liquid, a semirigid solid.

Rate-law Expression

Equation relating the rate of a reaction to the concentrations of the reactants and the specific rate of the constant.

Absolute Zero

The zero point on the absolute temperature scale, -273.15°C or 0 K, theoretically, the temperature at which molecular motion ceases. The concept of an absolute zero temperature was first deduced from experiments with gases. When a fixed volume of gas is cooled, its pressure decreases with its temperature. Absolute zero physically possesses quantum mechanical zero-point energy.