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There is no detectable change in the quantity of matter during an ordinary chemical reaction.

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Ideal Gas Law

The product of pressure and the volume of an ideal gas is directly proportional to the number of moles of the gas and the absolute temperature.

Conjugate Acid-base Pair

In Bronsted-Lowry terminology, a reactant and product that differ by a proton, H+.

Electroplating

Plating a metal onto a (cathodic) surface by electrolysis.

Anion

A negative ion, an atom or goup of atoms that has gained one or more electrons.

 

High Spin Complex

Crystal field designation for an outer orbital complex, all t2g and eg orbitals are singly occupied before any pairing occurs.

K Capture

Absorption of a K shell (n=1) electron by a proton as it is converted to a neutron.

Fluids

Substances that flow freely, gases and liquids.

Adhesive Forces

Forces of attraction between a liquid and another surface.

Melting Point

The temperature at which liquid and solid coexist in equilibrium, also the freezing point.

Sigma Bonds

Bonds resulting from the head-on overlap of atomic orbitals, in which the region of electron sharing is along and (cylindrically) symmetrical to the imaginary line connecting the bonded atoms.