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Discovered : by Henry Cavendish in 1766.
Isolated in London, UK.
Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘hydro genes’, meaning water forming.
Description :A colourless, odourless gas that burns and can form an explosive mixture with air. It is currently manufactured from methane gas, but is also produced by the electrolysis of water and aqueous salts. The gas is used to make such key materials as ammonia, cyclohexane and methanol, which are intermediates in the production of fertilisers, plastics and pharmaceuticals. Some see hydrogen gas as the clean fuel of the future - generated from water and returning to water when it is oxidised. Hydrogen-powered fuel cells are increasingly being seen as pollution-free sources of energy.

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Chemical Equilibrium

A state of dynamic balance in which the rates of forward and reverse reactions are equal, there is no net change in concentrations of reactants or products while a system is at equilibrium.

Critical Pressure

The pressure required to liquefy a gas (vapor) at its critical temperature.

Bonding Pair

Pair of electrons involved in a covalent bond.

Equation of State

An equation that describes the behavior of matter in a given state, the van der Waals equation describes the behavior of the gaseous state.

Ionic Compounds

Compounds containing predominantly ionic bonding.

Henry's Law

The pressure of the gas above a solution is proportional to the concentration of the gas in the solution.

Manometer

A two-armed barometer.

Temperature

A measure of the intensity of heat, i.e. the hotness or coldness of a sample. or object.

Standard Reaction

A reaction in which the numbers of moles of reactants shown in the balanced equation, all in their standard states, are completely converted to the numbers of moles of products shown in the balanced equation, also sall at their standard state.

Activity Series

A listing of metals (and hydrogen) in order of decreasing activity.