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Compounds that contain only carbon and hydrogen.

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The most expensive metal in the world

Do you think the most expensive metal is gold? No! On earth there are more valuable metals. But we need to divide the value of metals that occur in nature, and metals - isotopes, which are obtained in special laboratories. Let’s look at natural metals first.

Born-Haber Cycle

A series of reactions (and accompanying enthalpy changes) which, when summed, represents the hypothetical one-step reaction by which elements in their standard states are converted into crystals of ionic compounds (and the accompanying enthalpy changes.)

Surface Tension

It is the force in dynes acting along the surface of the liquid 1cm in length and perpendicular to it.

Catenation

Bonding of atoms of the same element into chains or rings.
The bonding together of atoms of the same element to form chains.
The ability of an element to bond to itself.

Specific Heat

The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one gram of substance one degree Celsius.

Atomic Orbital

Region or volume in space in which the probability of finding electrons is highest.

Bronsted-Lowry Acid

A proton donor.

Dynamic Equilibrium

An equilibrium in which processes occur continuously, with no net change. When two (or more) processes occur at the same rate so that no net change occurs.

Molarity

Number of moles of solute per litre of solution.

Coordination Sphere

The metal ion and its coordinating ligands but not any uncoordinated counter-ions.