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A process for the catalyzed industrial production of ammonia from N2 and H2 at high temperature and pressure.

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Carbanion

An organic ion carrying a negative charge on a carbon atom.

Conformations

Structures of a compound that differ by the extent of rotation about a single bond.

Valence Bond Theory

Assumes that covalent bonds are formed when atomic orbitals on different atoms overlap and the electrons are shared.

Saturated Solution

Solution in which no more solute will dissolve.

Diamagnetism

Weak repulsion by a magnetic field.

Avogadro's Law

At the same temperature and pressure, equal volumes of all gases contain the same number of molecules.

Coulomb

Unit of electrical charge.

Daughter Nuclide

Nuclide that is produced in a nuclear decay.

 

Electrophoresis

A technique for separation of ions by rate and direction of migration in an electric field.

Zinc

Discovered: known in India and China before 1500 and to the Greeks and Romans before 20 BC as the copper-zinc alloy brass
Origin: The name is derived from the German ‘Zink’.
Atomic no: 30
Mass No: 65
Description: A grey metal with a blue tinge. World production exceeds 7 million tons a year, and it is used to galvanise iron to prevent it rusting. It is also employed in alloys and batteries, and as zinc oxide to stabilise rubber and plastics. Zinc is essential for all living things, and is important for growth and development. The average human body contains about 2.5 grams and takes in about 15 milligrams per day. Some foods have above average levels of zinc, including herring, beef, lamb, sunflower seeds and cheese.

Unsaturated Hydrocarbons

Hydrocarbons that contain double or triple carbon-carbon bonds.

Chemical Equilibrium

A state of dynamic balance in which the rates of forward and reverse reactions are equal, there is no net change in concentrations of reactants or products while a system is at equilibrium.

Moderator

A substance such as hydrogen, deuterium, oxygen or paraffin capable of slowing fast nuetrons upon collision.

Saccharate

A compound formed by interaction of sucrose with a metallic oxide, usually lime, and useful in the purification of sugar.

 

Alkyl Group

A group of atoms derived from an alkane by the removal of one hydrogen atom.

Condensed States

The solid and liquid states.

Isomorphous

Refers to crystals having the same atomic arrangement.

Tyndall Effect

The scattering of light by colloidal particles.

Activation Energy

Amount of energy that must be absorbed by reactants in their ground states to reach the transition state so that a reaction can occur. In other words, activation energy is the minimum energy required for a chemical reaction to occur.

Overlap

The interaction of orbitals on different atoms in the same region of space.