Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
 

A solid characterized by a regular, ordered arrangement of particles.

Latest Articles

  • Gas of rotten eggs

    If you happen to break a rotten egg, then you know the smell of hydrogen sulfide, because the stench of the spoiled egg depends on of its presence in rotting protein substances.

  • Creating Malachite egg

    One of the most interesting and obvious chemical experiments is the experiment on the interaction of copper sulfate and calcium carbonate. The latter is contained in the shell of a simple egg, but copper sulphate should be searched in a chemical reagent store. This experience is simple, but...

  • Diamonds Are Forever

    Diamonds are still a girl's best friend, right? We love the shiny gems. They are the most popular rocks sold today. But what exactly are they, anyway? Where do they come from? What else are they used for?

  • Chemistry of the sky

    Chemistry can teach us about the composition of celestial bodies and determine their age.

  • Harmful Chemicals Found In Food

    It's getting close to New Years and many people are starting to think about how to lose those extra pounds they managed to gain over the holidays. There are many sorts of diets and fads that have developed over the years from cutting carbs to cutting protein. Everyone has their own opinion as to...



Most Popular

Hydrogen

Discovered : by Henry Cavendish in 1766.
Isolated in London, UK.
Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘hydro genes’, meaning water forming.
Description :A colourless, odourless gas that burns and can form an explosive mixture with air. It is currently manufactured from methane gas, but is also produced by the electrolysis of water and aqueous salts. The gas is used to make such key materials as ammonia, cyclohexane and methanol, which are intermediates in the production of fertilisers, plastics and pharmaceuticals. Some see hydrogen gas as the clean fuel of the future - generated from water and returning to water when it is oxidised. Hydrogen-powered fuel cells are increasingly being seen as pollution-free sources of energy.

Ionization Constant

Equilibrium constant for the ionization of a weak electrolyte.

Enantiomer

One of the two mirror-image forms of an optically active molecule.

Anion

A negative ion, an atom or goup of atoms that has gained one or more electrons.

 

Fossil Fuels

Substances consisting largely of hydrocarbons, derived from decay of organic materials under geological conditions of high pressure and temperature (metamorphism) include coal, petroleum, natural gas, peat and oil shale.  For further information see Fuel Chemistry

Hydration Energy

The energy change accompanying the hydration of a mole of gase and ions.

Electrolyte

A substance whose aqueous solutions conduct electricity.

 

Periodicity

Regular periodic variations of properties of elements with atomic number (and position in the periodic table).

Debye

The unit used to express dipole moments.

Allotropic Modifications (Allotropes)

Different forms of the same element in the same physical state.