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Compounds containing predominantly covalent bonds.

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Law of Combining Volumes (Gay-Lussac's Law)

At constant temperature and pressure, the volumes of reacting gases (and any gaseous products) can be expressed as ratios of small whole numbers.

 

Organic Chemistry

The chemistry of substances that contain carbon-hydrogen bonds.

Concentration

Amount of solute per unit volume or mass of solvent or of solution.

Basic Salt

A salt containing an ionizable OH group.

Degenerate

Of the same energy.

Cyclotron

A device for accelerating charged particles along a spiral path.

Oxidation Numbers

Arbitrary numbers that can be used as mechanical aids in writing formulas and balancing equations, for single- atom ions they correspond to the charge on the ion, more electronegative atoms are assigned negative oxidation numbers (also called Oxidation states).

Octane Number

A number that indicates how smoothly a gasoline burns.

Periodicity

Regular periodic variations of properties of elements with atomic number (and position in the periodic table).

Pairing Energy

Energy required to pair two electrons in the same orbital.

Hydrocarbons

Compounds that contain only carbon and hydrogen.

xenon

A heavy, colorless, chemically inactive, monatomic gaseous element used for filling radio, television, and luminescent tubes. Symbol: Xe, at. wt.: 131.30, at. no.: 54.

Radiation

High energy particles or rays emitted during the nuclear decay processes.

Molecular Geometry

The arrangement of atoms (not lone pairs of electrons) around a central atom of a molecule or polyatomic ion.

Reverse Osmosis

Forcing solvent molecules to flow through a semipermable membrane from a concentated solution into a dilute solution by the application of greater hydrostatic pressure on concentrated side than the osmotic pressure opposing it.

Heterogeneous Equilibria

Equilibria involving species in more than one phase.

Charle's Law

At constant pressure the volume occupied by a definite mass of gas is directly proportional to its absolute temperature.

Chemical Bonds

The attractive forces that hold atoms together in elements or compounds.

Anion

A negative ion, an atom or goup of atoms that has gained one or more electrons.

 

Alpha (a) Particle

Helium ion with 2+ charge, an assembly of two protons and two neutrons.