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Discovered : by Sir William Ramsay in London, and independently by P.T. Cleve and N.A. Langlet in Uppsala, Sweden in 1895.
Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘helios’,sun.
Description :A colourless, odourless gas that is totally unreactive. It is extracted from natural gas wells, some of which contain gas that is 7% helium. It is used in deep sea diving for balloons and, as liquid helium, for low temperature research. The Earth’s atmosphere contains 5 parts per million by volume, totalling 400 million tons, but it is not worth extracting it from this source at present.
Atomic No:2 MAss No:4

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Saccharic acid

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The amount of heat absorbed in the formation of one mole of a substance in a specified state from its elements in their standard states.

Eluate

Solvent (or mobile phase) which passes through a chromatographic column and removes the sample components from the stationary phase.

Hydrolysis Constant

An equilibrium constant for a hydrolysis reaction.

Deposition

The direct solidification of a vapor by cooling, the reverse of sublimation.

Sublimation

The direct vaporization of a sold by heating without passing through the liquid state.

Evaporization

Vaporization of a liquid below its boiling point.

Amorphous Solid

A noncrystalline solid with no well-defined ordered structure.