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Describes the order in which electrons fill orbitals in atoms.

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Mass

A measure of the amount of matter in an object. Mass is usually measured in grams or kilograms.

Deposition

The direct solidification of a vapor by cooling, the reverse of sublimation.

Greenhouse Effect

Trapping of heat at the surface of the earth by carbon dioxide and water vapour in the atmosphere.

Corrosion

Oxidation of metals in the presence of air and moisture.

Dubnium

Discovered : at both Berkeley, California, USA, and Dubna, near Moscow, Russia in 1970. Description:A highly radioactive metal which does not occur naturally, and of which only a few atoms have ever been made. It is of research interest only. Origin:The element is named after the Russian town of Dubna.

Saccharate

A compound formed by interaction of sucrose with a metallic oxide, usually lime, and useful in the purification of sugar.

 

Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion Theory

Assumes that electron pairs are arranged around the central element of a molecule or polyatomic ion so that there is maximum separation (and minimum repulsion) among regions of high electron density.

 

Miscibility

The ability of one liquid to mix with (dissolve in) another liquid.

Distillation

The separation of a liquid mixture into its components on the basis of differences in boiling points. The process in which components of a mixture are separated by boiling away the more volitile liquid.

Associated Ions

Short-lived species formed by the collision of dissolved ions of opposite charges.

Percent Purity

The percent of a specified compound or element in an impure sample.

Hybridization

Mixing a set of atomic orbitals to form a new set of atomic orbitals with the same total electron capacity and with properties and energies intermediate between those of the original unhybridized orbitals.

Effective Collisons

Collision between molecules resulting in a reaction, one in which the molecules collide with proper relative orientations and sufficient energy to react.

 

xenon tetrafluoride

A colorless, crystalline compound, XeF4, prepared by heating a gaseous mixture of fluorine and xenon.

Adsorption

Adhesion of a species onto the surfaces of particles.

Solubility Product Principle

The solubility product constant expression for a slightly soluble compound is the product of the concentrations of the constituent ions, each raised to the power that corresponds to the number of ions in one formula unit.

Structural Isomers

Compounds that contain the same number of the same kinds of atoms in different geometric arrangements.

Electrolytic Conduction

Conduction of electrical current by ions through a solution or pure liquid.

Control Rods

Rods of materials such as cadmium or boron steel that act as neutron obsorbers (not merely moderaters) used in nuclear reactors to control neutron fluxes and therfore rates of fission.

Fat

Solid triester of glycerol and (mostly) saturated fatty acids.