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Radius of an atom.

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    Diamonds are still a girl's best friend, right? We love the shiny gems. They are the most popular rocks sold today. But what exactly are they, anyway? Where do they come from? What else are they used for?

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    Most of the microscopes used today are compound. A compound microscope features two or more lenses. A hollow cylinder called the tube connects the two lenses. The top lens, the one people look through, is called the eyepiece. The bottom lens is known as the objective lens. Below the two lenses is...

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Graham's Law

The rates of effusion of gases are inversely proportional to the square roots of their molecular weights or densities.

Geiger counter

A gas filled tube which discharges electriaclly when ionizing radiation passes through it.

Optical Activity

The rotation of plane polarized light by one of a pair of optical isomers.

 

Downs Cell

Electrolytic cell for the commercial electrolysis of molten sodium chloride. For further information see Electrochemistry or Fuel Cells.

Equilibrium or Chemical Equilibrium

A state of dynamic balance in which the rates of forward and reverse reactions are equal, the state of a system when neither forward or reverse reaction is thermodynamically favored.

Helium

Discovered : by Sir William Ramsay in London, and independently by P.T. Cleve and N.A. Langlet in Uppsala, Sweden in 1895.
Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘helios’,sun.
Description :A colourless, odourless gas that is totally unreactive. It is extracted from natural gas wells, some of which contain gas that is 7% helium. It is used in deep sea diving for balloons and, as liquid helium, for low temperature research. The Earth’s atmosphere contains 5 parts per million by volume, totalling 400 million tons, but it is not worth extracting it from this source at present.
Atomic No:2 MAss No:4

Octane Number

A number that indicates how smoothly a gasoline burns.

xylan

The pentosan occurring in woody tissue that hydrolyzes to xylose: used as a source of furfural.

Second Law of Thermodynamics

The universe tends toward a state of greater diorder in spontaneous processes.

Metallurgy

Refers to the overall processes by which metals are extracted from ores.

Bonding Pair

Pair of electrons involved in a covalent bond.

Heat of Crystallization

The amount of heat that must be removed from one gram of a liquid at its freezing point to freeze it with no change in temperature.

Alkaline Earth Metals

Group IIA metals

Acid

A substance that produces H+(aq) ions in aqueous solution. Strong acids ionize completely or almost completely in dilute aqueous solution. Weak acids ionize only slightly. Chemicals or substances having the property of an acid are said to be acidic.

Nuclear Fission

The process in which a heavy nucleus splits into nuclei of intermediate masses and one or more protons are emitted.

Degenerate

Of the same energy.

Hydrogen-Oxygen Fuel Cell

Fuel cell in which hydrogen is the fuel (reducing agent) and oxygen is the oxidizing agent.

 

Ionization Isomers

Isomers that result from the interchange of ions inside and outside the coordination sphere.

Emulsifying Agent

A sustance that coats the particles of the dispersed phase and prevents coagulation of colloidal particles, an emulsifier.

Structural Isomers

Compounds that contain the same number of the same kinds of atoms in different geometric arrangements.