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Elements 89 to 103 (between lawrencium and actinium) on the periodic table. Only the first four have been found in nature in appreciable amounts. The remainder have been produced synthetically.

All actinides are radioactive, highly electropositive, tarnish readily in air, react with boiling water or dilute acid to release hydrogen gas and combine directly with most nonmetals.

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Stereoisomers

Isomers that differ only in the way that atoms are oriented in space, consist of geometrical and optical isomers.

 

Isoelectric

Having the same electronic configurations.

Atomic Orbital

Region or volume in space in which the probability of finding electrons is highest.

Electron Configuration

Specific distribution of electrons in atomic orbitals of atoms or ions.

Solution

Homogeneous mixture of two or more substances.

Cathode Ray Tube

Closed glass tube containing a gas under low pressure, with electrodes near the ends and a luminescent screen at the end near the positive electrode, produces cathode rays when high voltage is applied.

Specific Heat

The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one gram of substance one degree Celsius.

Alums

Hydrated sulfates of the general formula M+M3+(SO4)2.12H2).

Ternary Compound

A compound consisting of three elements, may be ionic or covalent.

Free Radical

A highly reactive chemical species carrying no charge and having a single unpaired electron in an orbital.