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Discovered: known in India and China before 1500 and to the Greeks and Romans before 20 BC as the copper-zinc alloy brass
Origin: The name is derived from the German ‘Zink’.
Atomic no: 30
Mass No: 65
Description: A grey metal with a blue tinge. World production exceeds 7 million tons a year, and it is used to galvanise iron to prevent it rusting. It is also employed in alloys and batteries, and as zinc oxide to stabilise rubber and plastics. Zinc is essential for all living things, and is important for growth and development. The average human body contains about 2.5 grams and takes in about 15 milligrams per day. Some foods have above average levels of zinc, including herring, beef, lamb, sunflower seeds and cheese.

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Hydration Energy

The energy change accompanying the hydration of a mole of gase and ions.

Anion

A negative ion, an atom or goup of atoms that has gained one or more electrons.

 

Ionization

In aqueous solution, the process in which a molecular compound reacts with water and forms ions.

Molarity

Number of moles of solute per litre of solution.

Basic Anhydride

The oxide of a metal that reacts with water to form a base.

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Critical Mass

The minimum mass of a particular fissionable nuclide in a given volume required to sustain a nuclear chain reaction.

Salinometer

An instrument for measuring the amount of salt in a solution. Also,"salimeter, salometer."

Chemical Equation

Description of a chemical reaction by placing the formulas of the reactants on the left and the formulas of products on the right of an arrow.