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Discovered: known in India and China before 1500 and to the Greeks and Romans before 20 BC as the copper-zinc alloy brass
Origin: The name is derived from the German ‘Zink’.
Atomic no: 30
Mass No: 65
Description: A grey metal with a blue tinge. World production exceeds 7 million tons a year, and it is used to galvanise iron to prevent it rusting. It is also employed in alloys and batteries, and as zinc oxide to stabilise rubber and plastics. Zinc is essential for all living things, and is important for growth and development. The average human body contains about 2.5 grams and takes in about 15 milligrams per day. Some foods have above average levels of zinc, including herring, beef, lamb, sunflower seeds and cheese.

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Most Popular

Saturated Hydrocarbons

Hydrocarbons that contain only single bonds. They are also called alkanes or paraffin hydrocarbons.

Spectator Ions

Ions in a solution that do not participate in a chemical reaction.

Specific Gravity

The ratio of the density of a substance to the density of water.

Stoichiometry

Description of the quantitative relationships among elements and compounds as they undergo chemical changes.

Heat Capacity

The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a body (of any mass) one degree Celsius.

Evaporization

Vaporization of a liquid below its boiling point.

Cis-Trans Isomerism

A type of geometrical isomerism related to the angles between like ligands.

Ligand

A Lewis base in a coordination compound.

Lanthanides

Elements 58 to 71 (after lanthanum).

Helium

Discovered : by Sir William Ramsay in London, and independently by P.T. Cleve and N.A. Langlet in Uppsala, Sweden in 1895.
Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘helios’,sun.
Description :A colourless, odourless gas that is totally unreactive. It is extracted from natural gas wells, some of which contain gas that is 7% helium. It is used in deep sea diving for balloons and, as liquid helium, for low temperature research. The Earth’s atmosphere contains 5 parts per million by volume, totalling 400 million tons, but it is not worth extracting it from this source at present.
Atomic No:2 MAss No:4