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Hydrocarbons that contain double or triple carbon-carbon bonds.

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Solution

Homogeneous mixture of two or more substances.

Isoelectric

Having the same electronic configurations.

Saccharic acid

A white, needlelike, crystalline, water-soluble solid or syrup, C6H10O8, usually made by the oxidation of cane sugar, glucose, or starch by nitric acid. Also called "Glucaric acid."

yttria

Y2O3: A white, water-insoluble powder, Y2O3, used chiefly in incandescent gas and acetylene mantles.

Actual Yield

Amount of a specified pure product actually obtained from a given reaction. Compare with Theoretical Yield.

Homogeneous Equilibria

Equilibria involving only one species in a single phase. For example, all gases, all liquids or all solids.

Transition State Theory

Theory of reaction rates that states that reactants pass through high-energy transition states before forming products.

Gamma Ray

High energy electromagnetic radiation. A highly penetrating type of nuclear radiation similar to x-ray radiation, except that it comes from within the nucleus of an atom and has a higher energy. Energywise, very similar to cosmic ray except that cosmic rays originate from outer space.

Voltage

Potential difference between two electrodes, a measure of the chemical potential for a redox reaction to occur.

Dispersing Medium

The solvent-like phase in a colloid.