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An insoluble solid formed by mixing in solution the constituent ions of a slightly soluble solution.

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Law of Definite Proportions (Law of Constant Composition)

The law stating that a pure substance will always have the same percent by weight. Different samples of a pure compound always contain the same elements in the same proportions by mass.

Zinc

Discovered: known in India and China before 1500 and to the Greeks and Romans before 20 BC as the copper-zinc alloy brass
Origin: The name is derived from the German ‘Zink’.
Atomic no: 30
Mass No: 65
Description: A grey metal with a blue tinge. World production exceeds 7 million tons a year, and it is used to galvanise iron to prevent it rusting. It is also employed in alloys and batteries, and as zinc oxide to stabilise rubber and plastics. Zinc is essential for all living things, and is important for growth and development. The average human body contains about 2.5 grams and takes in about 15 milligrams per day. Some foods have above average levels of zinc, including herring, beef, lamb, sunflower seeds and cheese.

Water Equivalent

The amount of water that would absorb the same amount of heat as the calorimeter per degree temperature increase.

Ore

A natural deposit containing a mineral of an element to be extracted.

Electronic Geometry

The geometric arrangement of orbitals containing the shared and unshared electron pairs surrounding the central atom of a molecule or polyatomic ion.

Supercritical Fluid

A substance at temperature above its critical temperature.

Hund's Rule

All orbitals of a given sublevel must be occupied by single electrons before pairing begins.

Strong Electrolyte

A substance that conducts electricity well in a dilute aqueous solution.

 

Radical

An atom or group of atoms that contains one or more unpaired electrons (usually very reactive species)

Nucleus

The very small, very dense, positively charged center of an atom containing protons and neutrons, as well as other subatomic particles.

Background Radiation

Ratiation extraneous to an experiment. Usually the low-level natural radiation form cosmic rays and trace radioactive substances present in our environment.

Cis-

The prefix used to indicate that groups are located on the same side of a bon about which rotation is restricted.

Boyle's Law

At constant temperature the volume occupied by a definite mass of a gas is inversely proportional to the applied pressure.

Fatty Acids

An aliphatic acid, many can obtained from animal fats.

Heat of Condensation

The amount of heat that must be removed from one gram of a vapor at it's condensation point to condense the vapour with no change in temperature.

Equilibrium or Chemical Equilibrium

A state of dynamic balance in which the rates of forward and reverse reactions are equal, the state of a system when neither forward or reverse reaction is thermodynamically favored.

Colloid

A heterogeneous mixture in which solute-like particles do not settle out.

Rate-determining Step

The slowest step in a mechanism, the step that determines the overall rate of reaction.

Coordinate Covalent Bond

A covalent bond in which both shared electrons are donated by the same atom, a bond between a Lewis base and a Lewis acid.

Adsorption

Adhesion of a species onto the surfaces of particles.