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The chemistry of substances that contain carbon-hydrogen bonds.

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Leveling Effect

Effect by which all acids stronger than the acid that is characteristic of the solvent react with solvent to produce that acid, similar statement applies to bases. The strongest acid (base) that can exist in a given solvent is the acid (base) characteristic of the solvent.

ytterbium

A rare metallic element found in gadolinite and forming compounds resembling those of yttrium. Symbol: Yb, at. wt.: 173.04, at. no.: 70, sp. gr.: 6.96. Cf."rare-earth element."

 

Zinc

Discovered: known in India and China before 1500 and to the Greeks and Romans before 20 BC as the copper-zinc alloy brass
Origin: The name is derived from the German ‘Zink’.
Atomic no: 30
Mass No: 65
Description: A grey metal with a blue tinge. World production exceeds 7 million tons a year, and it is used to galvanise iron to prevent it rusting. It is also employed in alloys and batteries, and as zinc oxide to stabilise rubber and plastics. Zinc is essential for all living things, and is important for growth and development. The average human body contains about 2.5 grams and takes in about 15 milligrams per day. Some foods have above average levels of zinc, including herring, beef, lamb, sunflower seeds and cheese.

Exothermic

Describes processes that release heat energy.

Coordinate Covalent Bond

A covalent bond in which both shared electrons are donated by the same atom, a bond between a Lewis base and a Lewis acid.

Tetrahedral

A term used to describe molecules and polyatomic ions that have one atom in center and four atoms at the corners of a tetrahedron.

Do you know: some mosquitoes bite people because of their clothes

If you have ever been bitten by a mosquito, someone nearby surely gave you an explanation of why the nasty insect decided to spoil your day. Maybe they told you that you smelt good, or you had a certain type of blood or that in that shirt you looked like a potential victim.

Semipermable Membrane

A thin partition between two solutions through which certain molecules can pass but others cannot.

Cathode

Electrode at which reduction occurs in a cathode ray tube, the negative electrode.

Element

A substance that cannot be decomposed into simpler substances by chemical means.