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A theory of chemical bonding based upon the postulated existence of molecular orbitals.

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Coordination Compound or Complex

A compound containing coordinate covalent bonds.

Paramagnetism

Attraction toward a magnetic field, stronger than diamagnetism, but still weak compared to ferromagnetism.

Leclanche Cell

A common type of dry cell.

Ternary Acid

A ternary compound containing H, O, and another element, often a nonmetal.

Ground State

The lowest energy state or most stable state of an atom, molecule or ion.

Atomic Number


Integral number of protons in the nucleus, defines the identity of element.
 

Dissociation

In aqueous solution, the process in which a solid ionic compound separates into its ions.

Allotropic Modifications (Allotropes)

Different forms of the same element in the same physical state.

Oxidation

An algebraic increase in the oxidation number, may correspond to a loss of electrons.

Pineapple literally "erodes" the tongue

Everyone who has ever tried fresh pineapple knows that if you eat too much, your lips and tongue hurt for a while. This is because the pineapple contains an enzyme called bromelain. This enzyme literally "erodes" the tongue.