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A Lewis base in a coordination compound.

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Amphoterism

The ability to react with both acids and bases.Ability of substance to act as either an acid or a base.

Saturated Hydrocarbons

Hydrocarbons that contain only single bonds. They are also called alkanes or paraffin hydrocarbons.

Canal Ray

Stream of positively charged particles (cations) that moves toward the negative electrode in cathode ray tubes, observed to pass through canals in the negative electrode.

Amino Acid

Compound containing both an amino and a carboxylic acid group.The --NH2 group.

Heat of Vaporization

The amount of heat required to vaporize one gram of a liquid at its boiling point with no change in temperature. Usually expressed in J/g. The molar heat of vaporization is the amount of heat required to vaporize one mole of liquid at its boiling point with no change in temperature and usually expressed ion kJ/mol.

Colloid

A heterogeneous mixture in which solute-like particles do not settle out.

Colligative Properties

Physical properties of solutions that depend upon the number but not the kind of solute particles present.

Explosive limits

The range of concentrations over which a flammable vapour mixed with proper ratios of air will ignite or explode if a source of ignitions is provided.

Group

A vertical column in the periodic table, also called a family.

Acid

A substance that produces H+(aq) ions in aqueous solution. Strong acids ionize completely or almost completely in dilute aqueous solution. Weak acids ionize only slightly. Chemicals or substances having the property of an acid are said to be acidic.