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The minimum amount of energy required to remove the most loosely held electron of an isolated gaseous atom or ion.

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Alkylbenzene

A compound containing an alkyl group bonded to a benzene ring.

Avogadro's Law

At the same temperature and pressure, equal volumes of all gases contain the same number of molecules.

Valence Bond Theory

Assumes that covalent bonds are formed when atomic orbitals on different atoms overlap and the electrons are shared.

Salicylate

A salt or ester of salicylic acid.

Combustible

Classification of liquid substances that will burn on the basis of flash points. A combustible liquid means any liquid having a flash point at or above 37.8°C (100°F) but below 93.3°C (200°F), except any mixture having components with flash points of 93.3°C (200°F) or higher, the total of which makes up 99 percent or more of the total volume of the mixture.

Hard Water

Water containing Fe3+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ ions, which forms precipates with soap.

Conformations

Structures of a compound that differ by the extent of rotation about a single bond.

Allotropes

Different forms of the same element in the same physical state.

Chemical Change

A change in which one or more new substances are formed.

Inhibitory Catalyst

An inhibitor, a catalyst that decreases the rate of reaction.