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The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a body (of any mass) one degree Celsius.

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Electronic Transition

The transfer of an electron from one energy level to another.

Molarity

Number of moles of solute per litre of solution.

Equivalent Weight

An oxidizing or reducing agent, who's mass gains (oxidizing agents) or loses (reducing agents) 6.022 x 1023 electrons in a redox reaction.
The mass of an acid or base that furnishes or reacts with 6.022 x 1023 H3O+ or OH- ions.

Chemical Safety

People use chemicals every day for a wide array of purposes, which can include work and house hold duties. Many of us fail to realize that we are actually handling potentially deadly chemicals when we simply clean the bathroom or wash the car.

This brings to mind the reason why chemical safety is so important and why you should always use the chemicals that you own for their intended purpose only. Otherwise, the repercussions could be disastrous to say the least. There are specific things that you and those around you should do when handling, storing or using chemicals in nearly every form.

Hydrate

A solid compound that contains a definite percentage of bound water.

Supercooled Liquids

Liquids that, when cooled, apparently solidify but actually continue to flow very slowly under the influence of gravity e.g glass.

Enantiomer

One of the two mirror-image forms of an optically active molecule.

Foam

Colloidal suspension of a gas in a liquid.

Hydrogen

Discovered : by Henry Cavendish in 1766.
Isolated in London, UK.
Origin : The name is derived from the Greek ‘hydro genes’, meaning water forming.
Description :A colourless, odourless gas that burns and can form an explosive mixture with air. It is currently manufactured from methane gas, but is also produced by the electrolysis of water and aqueous salts. The gas is used to make such key materials as ammonia, cyclohexane and methanol, which are intermediates in the production of fertilisers, plastics and pharmaceuticals. Some see hydrogen gas as the clean fuel of the future - generated from water and returning to water when it is oxidised. Hydrogen-powered fuel cells are increasingly being seen as pollution-free sources of energy.

Hydrolysis

The reaction of a substance with water or its ions.