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The increase in the boiling point of a solvent caused by the dissolution of a nonvolatile solute.

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Atomic Number


Integral number of protons in the nucleus, defines the identity of element.
 

How to make crystal glass

From history we know that the idea of creating crystal belongs to the British: they were the first to add lead oxides to the charge material, and as a result got glass with unusual “voice”, transparency and sparkling faces. Classical crystal contains 24% of lead oxide, but there are products with a higher content of up to 30%.

Charle's Law

At constant pressure the volume occupied by a definite mass of gas is directly proportional to its absolute temperature.

Solution

Homogeneous mixture of two or more substances.

Endothermicity

The absorption of heat by a system as the process occurs.

Reversible Reaction

Reactions that do not go to completion and occur in both the forward and reverse direction.

Double Bond

Covalent bond resulting from the sharing of four electrons (two pairs) between two atoms.

Heavy Water

Water containing deuterium, a heavy isotope of hydrogen.

Ionic Compounds

Compounds containing predominantly ionic bonding.

Colloid

A heterogeneous mixture in which solute-like particles do not settle out.